‘Long Division’

Photo credit: Gerald Allain

LeuWebb Project’s large-scale barricade ‘Long Division’ is an invitation into the experience of boundaries that are drawn around public and private spaces. The outdoor installation employs the fence as a tool for considering issues of exclusion, control, security and sanctuary around Mississauga’s Bradley Museum.

Founded by Christine Leu and Alan Webb, LeuWebb Projects utilizes a range of disciplines that include light, space, texture, and sound as key components of their work.

The duo weaves innovative materials and technologies to create site-specific art that is not only seen but is also experienced.

LeuWebb’s ‘Long Division’ questions the site’s origins while looking to the fence to consider the current and future ideas of nation and boundary, which regards the shifting relationships and attitudes toward migrant and refugee’s freedom of movement.

The land art installation features a series of loosely concentric rings with discrete openings, inviting participants to move within the layers of fencing, to draw people to the centre ring.

Webb and Leu state that this work “engages in a dialogue with the Bradley Museum site and adds a new critical layer that opens up questions about control, exclusion, and inclusion, ultimately seeking to complicate the idea of fence through subverting its function and formal qualities, inviting the potential for play and participatory structural manipulations.”

‘Long Division’ was curated by Noa Bronstein, and artists Joi T. Arcand, Germaine Koh, and Morris Lum, in Mississauga, Ontario, for the May 2019 ‘Public Volumes’ exhibition.

The team’s collaborative practice draws on art and architecture and embraces the process of creative exploration to produce moments of beauty in the public realm.

According to LeuWebb, the creative union seeks to engage people with both the tangible and the ephemeral aspects of everyday life by creating art that stimulates curiosity, suggests play, and inspires its participants.

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